|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Ecuador (Click here for more)

Southern Ecuador’s Puyango Petrified Forest Becomes a Draw for Tourists

MACHALA, Ecuador – The Puyango River Valley in southwestern Ecuador is home to a petrified forest with a large number of trunks that were turned by a cataclysm more than 100 million years ago from trees into granite.

The petrified forest, located on the border of El Oro and Loja provinces, provides visitors with a chance to observe the tree trunks lying on the ground, learn about wildlife and plants, and enjoy the great variety of foods served in the area.

The forest, one hour by bus from Santa Rosa Airport in El Oro, is among the new destinations being promoted by the Tourism Ministry as part of its Viaje Primero Ecuador program to spread the word about Ecuador’s attractions.

Puyango Petrified Forest, which is on Ecuador’s Natural and Cultural Heritage List, covers 2,659 hectares (6,000 acres) of subtropical dry jungle between 300 meters and 500 meters (985 feet and 1,640 feet) above sea level, with an average temperature of 22 C (71 F).

The petrified forest was discovered in 1971 and researchers have found fossils in the area dating to the Cretaceous period (between 65 million and 120 million years ago), Miriam Cordoba, a guide who was born in the area, said.

Although the area is considered rich in fossil deposits, studies have only scratched the surface in an attempt to protect the region, where inviting waterfalls beckon to visitors in the heat of the day.

Many tourists do take a plunge and residents say that a swim in the pristine waters of the streams winding through the region is good for one’s health.

Trails lead to the petrified tree trunks, which are of different lengths and thicknesses, and many of them have shapes that seem to have been cut with precision tools.

Only by touching them can a visitor be convinced that these are stone trunks and no longer living plants.

The Araucaria coniferous trees lived some 300 million years ago in the area and were buried by volcanic eruptions and earthquakes.

Tidal waves added high levels of pressure to the organic matter, preventing it from rotting in the absence of oxygen.

Some 10,000 visitors travel to the protected area around Puyango Petrified Forest each year, and park managers are working to expand the infrastructure needed to welcome more tourists, who are mainly from nearby Peru.


 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved