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  HOME | Science, Nature & Technology

Three Roman Shipwrecks Discovered off Egypt’s North Coast

CAIRO – Three shipwrecks that belong to the Roman Empire have been discovered off the coast of Alexandria, in the north of Egypt, the Egyptian ministry of antiquities said on Tuesday.

The ministry said the shipwrecks were found with various artifacts inside such as coins, ceramic vessels and pieces of glass.

Archaeologists found three gold coins from the time of Roman Emperor Augustus (63 BC-14 AD), in addition to a glass bust that is believed to have belonged to the Roman general Mark Antony, a contemporary of Augustus.

The wrecks were discovered in a submarine deposit located in Abu Qir Bay, on the outskirts of Alexandria, by the Central Department of the Underwater Antiquities in collaboration with the European Institute of Underwater Archeology.

“The excavation works indicate that a fourth shipwreck would be uncovered during the coming season as the mission uncovered some large wooden planks as well as archaeological remains of pottery vessels that may represent the cargo of the ship,” said Dr. Osama Alnahas, head of the Central Department.

Abu Qir Bay is already famous for housing the deposits of Thonis-Heraklion and Canopus, sunken cities of the 8th century BC that were discovered by French archaeologist Franck Goddio in 2000.

 

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