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  HOME | Science, Nature & Technology

Indonesia Presents Breeding Pair of Pandas Hun Chun, Cai Tao to the Press

BANGKOK – Two giant pandas were officially presented to the press on Wednesday at Indonesia’s Taman Safari park, in Western Java island, after completing their quarantine period.

According to the director of the Taman Safari, Jansen Manangsang, speaking to the Indonesian news agency Antara, both seven year old giant pandas Hun Chun and Cai Tao had completed their month-long quarantine period adding that now “both the Indonesian and Chinese governments will need to decide when the public will be able to see the giant pandas” but added he was confident “it will certainly be this November.”

Hun Chun – the female, whose name means “lake in spring” – and Cai Tao – meaning “colored porcelain” – arrived in Indonesia on Sept. 28 from the Sichuan Giant Panda Sanctuaries, located in China’s Sichuan province, declared World Heritage Site by UNESCO since 2006.

The female weighed 113 kilograms (249 pounds) and the male 128 kilograms when they landed in Jakarta through a 10-year transfer agreement in the hope both panda – teenagers – will breed in Indonesia by next year. Pandas can live on average up to 30 years,

Since then, according to their caregivers, the bamboo shoot-eating couple have been active, happy and receptive.

The Taman Safari park, located on the outskirts of Bogor, some 80 kilometers (49.7 miles) south of Jakarta, will keep the pandas in a 4,800 square kilometers enclosure (1,853 square miles) located 1,800 meters (5,905.5 feet) above sea level – a similar environment as the place they were born.

 

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