|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Science, Nature & Technology

Mourning, the Process Humans Need to Deal with Death

MEXICO CITY – From the time they are born, human beings must face numerous losses that they learn to accept through mourning, a process of emotional adaptation that, in the end, is the way of coming to terms with one’s own death or that of a loved one.

There are “many kinds of death and each one leads to mourning. Mourning is the time you take to get used to it, to adapt to the new reality,” the president of the Mexican Institute of Thanatology, Teresita Tinajero, told EFE.

Humans learn to understand mourning with small losses, which can either be natural or unnatural.

For example, a newborn baby’s first loss is the comfort of the maternal uterus, when for the first time he or she has to learn to ask for food.

Years later, when the youngster goes to school, it’s mom who suffers the feeling of loss when she sees her child going off on his own.

Though it doesn’t always mean sorrow or suffering, the loss of a job, the end of an engagement, or being the victim of a holdup also mean going through a time of sorrow, according to the specialist of this civil association founded in 1994.

Thanatology is a science that interprets the process of death, its rituals and their significance, while approaching it from the angles of biology, psychology, society and bioethics.

“These days, people pay much more attention to death,” Tinajero said, so that all that causes sorrow, suffering or concern is dealt with in different stages.

The expert gave as an example a patient who was diagnosed with brain cancer and was given a life expectancy of between three and five years.

First, the person goes through a phase of denial, unable to immediately grasp what the doctor is saying, then there’s so much anger that the patient gets mad at himself.

There is also a stage of negotiation or bargaining, during which the patient “negotiates feelings of guilt.”

The sick person commends himself or herself to Our Lady, or like an employee looks for ways to avoid being fired.

One can also decline into a stage of sadness or depression when facing death that leads to deep contemplation about the purpose of all you have done.

In the end the process of mourning – whether because of death or not – leads to the desired acceptation, when one deals with the reality and seeks, one way or another, to find a satisfactory explanation.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved