|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Science, Nature & Technology

New Model Explains Formation of Black Holes in Certain Galaxies

LONDON – An international team of astronomers, in a study published Wednesday in Nature magazine, is proposing a new model to explain the formation of supermassive black holes in the center of so-called “jellyfish” galaxies, huge spiral structures in deep space with arms that resemble tentacles.

The study, headed by scientists at the INAF Astronomical Observatory in Padua, Italy, studied images obtained by the VLT telescope at the Paranal observatory in Chile.

The astronomers analyzed the configurations of seven jellyfish galaxies located in galaxy clusters relatively close to Earth, six of which contain supermassive black holes at their centers that “feed” on gas circling around and into them due to their huge gravity.

The proportion of supermassive black holes found in such galaxies is far above the normal level, with just one in 10 “regular” galaxies having black holes with those characteristics.

The “solid link” between the two phenomena had not been predicted or discovered before, researcher Bianca Poggianti said in a communique from INAF.

The statistically significant find prompted researchers to analyze the formation process for jellyfish galaxies, the structure of which is the result of ram-pressure processes similar to those created in fluids.

The galaxies are attracted toward the centers of the clusters due to gravity.

During their “fall” toward a cluster’s center, the galaxies pass through regions of dense and hot gases that act on them like a strong wind that blows off long tails of gas toward the exterior of the main disk.

It seems that the central black hole can feed on part of the gas because, instead of being lost, it moves toward the center of the galaxy, Poggianti said.

The model proposed by the researcher and her group deals with the question of why just a small fraction of supermassive black holes in the center of galaxies are active, a phenomenon that is as yet unexplained by astronomers.

Yara Jaffe, with the European Southern Observatory, said that the recent observations suggest a new mechanism whereby the gas is channeled toward the black hole.

The result is important, she said, because it contributes a new piece to the puzzle connecting black holes with the galaxies housing them, a mechanism that is still not fully understood.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved