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  HOME | Science, Nature & Technology

Mexican Marine Biologist Works to Save Great White Sharks

MEXICO CITY – Mexican marine biologist Edgar Mauricio Hoyos is using his new book to spread the message for protection of great white sharks, an animal that he contends is nearly perfect.

“When we see a white shark, we shouldn’t think we’re at the gates of Hell, we’re dealing with one of the most perfect creatures in the whole world,” Hoyos said.

The marine biologist used the launch of his book, “El gran tiburon blanco, protector de los oceanos” (The Great White Shark, Protector of the Oceans), on Tuesday at a Mexico City museum to educate the public about great whites, noting that the huge predators do not eat humans.

Hoyos, who has spent 14 years studying great white sharks at Isla de Guadalupe, located about 355 kilometers (220 miles) off the coast of Baja California state, makes the case for protecting the creature in his plainly written 119-page book.

Great white sharks, which have been around since before the dinosaurs, visit Isla de Guadalupe each year between August and February, feeding on fish, sea lions and dead whales, maintaining balance in the marine ecosystem, Hoyos said.

“El gran tiburon blanco, protector de los oceanos” is the first book published in Latin America that contains everything there is to know about great whites.

Great white sharks are threatened by fishermen, who can get up to $50,000 for the animals’ fins and jaws.

Shark fins, especially those of great whites, are prized as a delicacy in Asia.

 

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