|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Science, Nature & Technology

Japan to Conduct First Clinical Trials of Drugs Developed with iPS Cells

TOKYO – Japanese researchers are set to begin the first clinical trials of a drug developed from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS), making it the world’s first clinical trial, Kyoto University said on Tuesday.

The trials of the drug, developed to treat an extremely rare and genetic bone disease, are set to begin in September on a group of 20 patients to test its effectiveness and safety after receiving a go-ahead by the review committee at Kyoto University Hospital, according to a statement by the university.

The drug is based on an agent capable of inhibiting the immune system called Rapamycin, found by Japanese researchers, thanks to the development of iPS cells that simulated progressive ossifying fibrodysplasia (FOP) symptoms, and were taken from patients suffering from this disease.

The condition, with only 1,200 cases worldwide and no known treatment so far, causes muscle tissue to be gradually replaced by bone, inhibiting movement of patients’ joints or even breathing.

The team has already tested the Rapamycin’s effectiveness in experiments with mice transplanting FOP patients’ iPS stem cells into them and found out that the drug inhibited abnormal bone formation.

This agent is already used in treatment of other diseases, prompting the Japanese researchers to believe in its positive results in humans, Junya Toguchida, professor at the Kyoto University and head of the team, said during a press conference, according to Japanese news agency Kyodo.

Shinya Yamanaka, a professor at the same center and considered the father of iPS cells, said he hoped that the clinical trials encourage the development of other drugs and help with the discovery of new treatments for rare diseases.

Yamanaka won the 2012 Nobel Prize in Medicine thanks to his discovery of a method to create iPS – which has the ability to transform into any type of cell – by reprogramming mature cells.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved