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  HOME | Society (Click here for more)

Kensington Implores Media Not to Publish Unauthorized Photos of Prince George

LONDON - Kensington Palace has asked media outlets to honor the policy to refrain from publishing any snapshots of Prince George, the son of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, that are unauthorized or taken by "paparazzi photographers" who "are going to increasingly extreme lengths to observe and monitor " the royal children.

In a letter issued to the media on Friday, Kensington Palace Communications Secretary Jason Knauf decried the "harassment and surveillance" endured by the 2-year-old Prince George, William and Kate Middleton's eldest, the great grandson to Queen Elizabeth II and third in the line of succession to the British throne.

"I am writing to provide an overview of the current challenges facing Kensington Palace as we seek to protect Prince George and Princess Charlotte from harassment and surveillance by paparazzi photographers," Knauf said in the letter, referring also to the royal couple's daughter, born last May 2.

The royal secretary expressed the gratitude of the royal family for all the British and international media outlets that do respect the rules that protect the family's privacy, but that all agencies need to follow suit, and that the market needs to understand "the unacceptable circumstances behind what are often lovely images."

"Paparazzi photographers are going to increasingly extreme lengths to observe and monitor Prince George's movements and covertly capture images of him to sell to the handful of international media titles still willing to pay for them," according to the statement.

"Incidents are becoming more frequent and the tactics more alarming. A line has been crossed... We feel readers deserve to understand the tactics deployed to obtain these pictures," it added.

Knauf thus listed several ploys used in hopes of taking unauthorized photos of the royal children, and gave the example of a photographer who parked a rented car outside a playground, "took the added step of hanging sheets inside the vehicle and created a hide stocked with food and drinks to get him through a full day of surveillance" while waiting for a photo opportunity.

The photographer was discovered in the trunk of the car attempting to take a photo with a long lens through a hole in the make-shift shelter made of bed sheets.
 

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