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  HOME | Society (Click here for more)

After 20 Years, Antonio Lopez Portrait of the Spanish Royal Family Is Ready

MADRID – Twenty years after it was started, Antonio Lopez’s “Familia de Juan Carlos I” has finally being hung up on Wednesday in what will be its permanent home, the Royal Palace, and as such marks its place in the history of five centuries of royal portraits.

Hanging in front Salvador Dali’s “El Principe de Ensueño,” Antonio Lopez’s long-awaited painting puts a final touch to a magnificent exhibition that Spain’s National Heritage has dedicated to the history of royal portraits with 114 works of art.

As the exhibition’s catalogue states, the presentation of a new painting has rarely generated so much public interest in recent times. Antonio Lopez is one of the greatest painters of Spain.

The exhibition showcases the importance of the National Heritage’s portrait collection. From Juan de Flandes’ painting of Queen Isabel the Catholic to Antonio Lopez’s, the exhibition is made up of important works.

With rooms filled with names such as Velazquez, Ribera, Mengs, Maella, Goya and Sorolla, the collection highlights the different stages of royal portraits, in which its evolution can be studied, not only showing changes in fashion and taste but also how the monarchs wanted to be painted.

 

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