|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Opinion (Click here for more)

TalCual: Mandela
Nelson Mandela was one of those human beings that, despite their physical disappearances, are still alive and will stay alive forever because they stopped belonging to themselves so they could become a heritage of humanity.

By TalCual

It may sound very commonplace to say that Nelson Mandela – Madiba as he was fondly called by his people in South Africa – has not died. And it is true: He has not. He was one of those human beings that, despite their physical disappearances, are still alive and will stay alive forever because they stopped belonging to themselves so they could become a heritage of humanity. His 28-year prison term made him one of the most powerful planetary icons in the fight for justice, equality, democracy, and a big long etcetera.

From his tiny cell in Robben Island, Mandela made a formidable moral force out of his political activist condition that not only inspired his own people, but millions around the world. Since he became an old man in prison, his image of a kind and credible elderly person was the one the world knew and admired as soon as he got out of there.

But Mandela was no saint; he really was one of the greatest political fighters during the 20th century. As a matter of fact, his struggle against the apartheid started as an armed fight, but his reflection over the subject, that who made him a wise man, convinced him that the racial discrimination South Africa was victim of was absolutely immoral – and at the same time, powerfully armed – and that it could only be defeated by opposing it a greater moral force.

Prison did not make Mandela a bitter man, despite having all the reasons in the world to be drawn into resentment and revenge, as he understood – and made his own people understand as well – that freedom could only come by the weight of moral force; through a pacific imposition of that moral force. And that is Mandela’s contribution to the struggle against the apartheid. That is the reason why he and his people came out triumphant.

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:




 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved