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  HOME | Opinion (Click here for more)

TalCual: Rights Denied in Venezuela
A denial to electoral rights. When President Nicolás Maduro decreed December 8 to become the “Day of Loyalty and Love to Chávez,” he is encouraging the celebration of public, and even institutional, events on that date. Such an outrage and abuse against the own essence of the electoral process can only be explained by an extreme despair of the regime in light of a possible defeat with unpredictable consequences.

By TalCual

In recent TalCual editorials, we have already made mention of the degree of obscenity to which President Nicolás Maduro has taken his symbiosis with the late Hugo Chávez. We don’t have to insist on this anymore, it only takes to listen to what he says on every given occasion and count the times he evokes Chávez just to have an idea on how exaggerated this kind of phenomenon is.

No doubt there is a lot of Maduro involved in that cult, most of all that mawkish and cheesy tone with no limits he uses, but there is also involved a cold political move.

Polls have shown that the popularity of the “son” of Chávez has experienced a steep drop, while his “father’s” holds steady (among other things, because death makes us indulgent), thus encouraging Maduro to try to disappear so we can think of him as a reincarnation of “Eternal” Chávez.

And, as a paradox of history, Chávez passed away when the “house” started smelling like it was burning as a result of fifteen years of economic mishandlings, while Maduro has it already set on fire.

But the heir of such sad legacy, incapable of being himself and above all, of being a good fireman, has no choice but to try to ape Chávez: My father speaks and acts for me. That is some sad destiny, a very sad one.

It is not worth it to keep talking about that issue either, so much about it has already been written, this “cult to personality,” very own of all dictatorial regimes that tend to give their power-monopolizing rulers a sacred image.

There are countless of examples, from the divine right of kings to Russia’s Stalin, the North Korean communist monarchy or the “omnisapience” of Fidel Castro…

But all of us Venezuelans have made a contribution to that fatidic tradition (we have to take credit for it) especially regarding the mix with an animist religiosity resulting in magical-religious phenomena such as the bunch of physical appearances of the demised Chávez.

But that offense to the rational capacity of Venezuelans has become a sharp object when Maduro decreed December 8 (the day when Chávez proclaimed him as his successor) to become the “Day of Loyalty and Love to Chávez,” he is encouraging the celebration of public, and even institutional, events on that date. Such an outrage and abuse against the own essence of the electoral process can only be explained by an extreme despair of the regime in light of a possible defeat with unpredictable consequences.

Despite having committed despicable acts, the National Electoral Council (CNE) has to disapprove this kind of monstrosity that goes against one of the fundamental principles of an electoral process, unequivocally defined by law, that bans political events and propaganda even a day before Election Day.

Without a doubt, this is a provocation, an intimidation, a disrespect that has no name. And opposition party Mesa de la Unidad Democrática (MUD) is forced to act by all means to stop that from happening.

The decree from Maduro is a call for violence, for the extreme utilization of fear and advantages embedded in all the political propaganda that has been paid for by the country’s public institutions. This is so serious that it all must be thought through time and again.

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