|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Arts & Entertainment

Being a Diner in a Bruegel Artwork is Now Possible in Brussels

BRUSSELS – Being one of the diners eating soup and drinking wine around a long table in a Pieter Bruegal painting will now be a possibility at an exhibition in Brussels from Wednesday.

The interactive show aims to offer visitors of the Atomium a chance to discover the world of the Dutch painter by becoming the subjects themselves.

“Bruegel, A Poetic Experience,” offers an introduction to the Renaissance painter, who was a master of landscape who portrayed the customs of the period.

Arnaud Bozzini, the director of exhibitions at the Atomium, Bruegel is for Belgium “a key figure who illustrates through his paintings the environment in which he lived.

“Through his techniques, even today you can see, he definitely marked the history of Renaissance art,” he added.

The show, aimed at visitors of all ages, does not include original artworks but instead reproductions and projections of the painter’s work.

The space “is not a museum” with the right conditions, the director said. “What we want to offer are the keys to understanding (...) one of the great masters of painting.”

But why has a building from 1958 been chosen to host the work of a painter from the Renaissance, who died over four centuries ago?

According to Bozzini, it’s about “Belgitude” – a concept that can be defined as the Belgium’s “essence” or “cultural identity,” which the famous structure is “exploring.”

The Atomium recently had exhibits celebrating Belgian surrealist artist Rene Magritte and the now defunct airline Sabena.

The Bruegel exhibit, which runs until 13 September, features installations that will allow viewers to immerse themselves in the artwork.

Spread over two heights on the ground floor, the exhibition shows five paintings belonging to the “Six Seasons” series via three-dimensional scenery, which invites the visitor to take a walk through “Bruguelian” landscapes.

The second floor focuses on the artist’s personality, whose life was shrouded in mystery.

The most surprising element in this space is a wooden table with two benches on either side, recreating the scene in “The Peasant Wedding.”

Complete with dishes and food, the scene will no doubt become a place in which to snap a selfie.

Born in Brussels around 1520, Bruegel set up in the Marolles neighborhood of Brussels, where he did most of his work.

He also lived in Antwerp for a time.

Little is known about the artist’s training but he began painting in the last 15 years of his life.

He left behind some 40 paintings.

Various exhibitions and activities are taking place in Belgium to commemorate the artist’s 450th death anniversary.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2021 © All rights reserved