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  HOME | Arts & Entertainment

Arriaga Explores Human Relations in Border between Mexico and US

VENICE, Italy – Mexican writer and filmmaker Guillermo Arriaga said he has explored the human angle in the border between Mexico and the United States in his latest work “No One Left Behind,” which was presented at the Venice Film Festival.

The half-an-hour-long film has been screened as a special event, with “Electric Swan” by Greek director Konstantina Kotzamani, and managed to fill the festival’s movie theater with numerous people left out of the session.

On his return more than 10 years after “The Burning Plain” in 2008, with this film starring Jorge A. Jimenez and Danny Huston, Arriaga delved into personal relationships on the border between his country and the US.

The film focuses on a group of American soldiers who access Mexican territory to carry out a secret mission, finding a different human reality from the one they set out with, which changes their perspective.

The director, who was the scriptwriter of the first Alejandro Gonzalez Ińarritu films and others such as “Amores perros,” said that the link between the two countries “is stronger than many think.”

Not only “for issues such as economics or immigration, but for a whole series of territorial relations that are incessantly formed beneath the surface,” he added.

He said that the theme was one which has always interested him and that he has explored as a screenwriter, as shown in “The Three Burials” of Melquiades Estrada and Babel, and as a director in “The Burning Plain.”

“I have written and directed this project in the light of tragic events (at the border) in order to show, in a respectful way, how far these links can be deep,” he added.

 

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