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  HOME | Arts & Entertainment

Major Pierre Bonnard Retrospective Gets Ready to Launch at UK’s Tate Modern

LONDON – A retrospective dedicated to French post-impressionist painter and print-maker Pierre Bonnard previewed at London’s Tate Modern on Monday.

For Bonnard, a member of the so-called “Les Nabis” painters who departed from three-dimensional designs in favor of color-drenched flat areas, color was one of the most important elements in his paintings and he saw it as a way of experiencing the world.

“The exhibition concentrates on Bonnard’s work from 1912, when color became a dominant concern, until his death in 1947,” the Tate Modern said on its site.

“It presents landscapes and intimate domestic scenes which capture moments in time – where someone has just left the room, a meal has just finished, a moment lost in the view from the window, or a stolen look at a partner,” the gallery added.

The painter took a great interest in the mundane and fleeting moments often depicting scenes of daily life nearly always from memory or from a photograph he had previously taken.

The quotidian scenes Bonnard painted were often saturated with color and the artist meticulously took notes of the new colors he created returning to older paintings to retouch them with the new hues he had mixed.

In keeping with the Nabi art movement, which saw artists venture into other disciplines and art forms, Bonnard dappled in furniture and set design, created textile patterns, made puppets and illustrated posters and books.

The “Colour of Memory” launches at the Tate Modern on Jan. 23 and runs until May 6.

 

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