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  HOME | Arts & Entertainment

Author Says Going to Where the News Happens Key to Kapuscinski’s Journalism

MADRID – Traveling to the places where the news happens is key to the type of journalism practiced by Poland’s Ryszard Kapuscinski, according to Spanish author Amelia Serraller Calvo, who sat down with EFE for an interview on Monday.

Serraller Calvo, who has just had her new book “Cenizas y fuego: Cronicas de Ryszard Kapuscinski” (“Ashes and Fire: Chronicles of Ryszard Kapuscinski”) published, defended the rigor and transcendence of the work of the late candidate for the Nobel Prize in Literature.

“It’s a kind of journalism that requires you to go to the place where things are happening,” she said. “Today there is practically no money for trips, and if there is, it’s very short or you’re freelancing out of your own pocket and taking your own risk.”

In an age of fake news, disinformation, distance from the places where events are happening, and reliance on the Internet, the author championed Kapuscinski’s commitment and approach to journalism.

Living somewhere for a time is a “thing of the past,” said Serraller Calvo, who doubts her colleagues from Spain get a chance to do it.

She stressed the importance of interacting with people in real life.

“From a newsroom however many kilometers away what are you going to be able to write from the comfort of a chair about people you don’t know and with whom you’ve not had any human interaction?” she pondered.

Besides his literary and philosophical vocation, Kapuscinski crafted a kind of “magical journalism,” the Spaniard said, adding that he “aspired to leave a mark on the reader,” and for him making a report was a complete work of art.

Kapuscinski was a Polish journalist, author, poet and photographer. He died in 2007.

 

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