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  HOME | Arts & Entertainment

Embattled Spanish Revelers Hurl Flour, Egg Bombs in Staged Coup d’Etat Party

IBI, Spain – Spanish revelers battled with flour bombs and eggs on Friday in an old tradition celebrated in the east of the country that takes place on the Spanish equivalent of April Fools’ Day.

The seemingly anarchic and iconic yearly tradition of Els Enafarinats – roughly translated as the ones who are covered in flour – which takes place in the eastern town of Ibi in the province of Valencia, saw locals take to the streets in military attire only to wreck their garments by launching eggs and flour at each other amid a cacophony of firecrackers.

The carnivalesque game starts the night before with Els Amantats – translated as the blanket-wrapped ones – announcing that the Enfarinants will seize power by staging a coup d’etat, at which point the Amantats tell the locals which side they will be on for the messy battle.

At 9:00 am on Dec. 28, the Enfarinants and their Opposition engage in the eccentric staged conflict which culminates with a party and dance at 5:00 pm.

The local tradition resurfaced in the 1980s, after it had disappeared, thanks to a small group of friends who decided to revive the age-old festival of unknown origin.

 

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