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  HOME | Arts & Entertainment

Iconic Rolls Royce Bonnet Mascot Cradled by Faberge Egg in Rare Creation

LONDON – Fine Jewelers Faberge and automobile company Rolls Royce on Tuesday presented a collaboration that saw the iconic car manufacturer’s bonnet ornament cocooned in the precious egg.

The “Spirit of Ectasy,” Faberge Egg, the result of a creative collaboration between two luxury brands is a contemporary and rare take on the well known and coveted bejeweled eggs.

“For the first time in history, an iteration of the Spirit of Ecstasy, the enigmatic mascot that has adorned Rolls-Royce motor cars since 1911, is cocooned in an exquisite, contemporary, Faberge Egg, “ Rolls Royce announced on its website.

“The design, conceived by Rolls-Royce Designers Stefan Monro and Alex Innes and rendered by Faberge Lead Designer Liisa Tallgren, has been brought to life by Faberge workmaster Paul Jones, creating a contemporary interpretation of one of the world’s most fabled and prized possessions,” Rolls Royce added.

The commission, two years in the making, was classified “Imperial Class” – a rarity given the previous one to be commissioned under this label was in 1917 – and will eventually be sold to a future patron but will first take pride of place in Faberge’s Christmas window display in London.

The House of Faberge launched in 1842 in St Petersburg, northwest Russia, and rose to fame for its ornate jewel-encrusted eggs 57 of which still survive today.

Most of the luxurious eggs were created under the watchful eye of Peter Carl Faberge between 1885 and 1917, he also oversaw the making of the most famous of the clutch: the 50 Imperial eggs designed for the Imperial Russian Royal Family.

The last Faberge egg sold for $9.58 million.

 

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