|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Arts & Entertainment

Spain’s Thyssen Museum Opens Intimate Exhibition That Explores Surrealism

MADRID – The Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum in Madrid launched on Tuesday a micro-exhibition that explores surrealism through key works spanning from 1923-1976 on loan from a private art collection.

The intimate exhibition at the Thyssen takes the viewer on what it described as a magical journey of some of surrealisms greats, ranging from Giorgio de Chirico, Max Ernst, Roberto Matta, Wilfredo Lam, Joan Miro to the great exponent of the movement, Salvador Dali, featuring the Spanish artist’s iconic “The Bleeding Roses” (1930) and “The Western Side of the Island of the Dead” (1934).

“The museum presents a selection of 13 works related to Surrealism from the ABANCA Art Collection,” the museum said in a statement, with a spokeswoman adding that ABANCA is a Basque bank.

“It begins with a picture by Giorgio de Chirico, a forerunner of the movement, and an oil painting by Max Ernst inspired by the Italian’s metaphysical landscapes. It continues in the 1930s when Miro adopted a more radical pictorial language and fewer expressive devices until arriving at his more characteristic mature style, which is also represented in the exhibition by a canvas executed in 1976,” the statement said.

The curator of the show, Juan Angel Lopez Manzanares explained to EFE that surrealism is possibly the most transcendental movement of the 20th century because it is never-ending.

“More than a defined artistic movement, Surrealism was a set of manifestos that offered ideas and explorations designed to be catalysts for social change that would trigger the adoption of a more balanced society,” Manzanares added.

The curator has arranged the dream-like paintings on a rich red backdrop adding to the sensual qualities of many of them and creating an intimate and cozy environment to take in the experimental artworks that compel the viewer to suspend disbelief and enter the world of the unconscious.

Dali and Surrealism in the ABANCA Art Collection is showing at the Thyssen Museum in Madrid until Jan. 27, the museum said.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2019 © All rights reserved