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  HOME | Arts & Entertainment

Tutankhamun’s Collection on Display after 95 Years of Obscurity

CAIRO – A collection of gold and leather objects from the tomb of King Tutankhamun that was mislaid 95 years ago went on display Thursday at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo.

Howard Carter, the famed British Egyptologist who discovered Tut’s tomb, placed the items in a wooden trunk that somehow ended up sitting in a dusty corner of the museum until an Egyptian-German archaeological team stumbled on it in 2014.

After finding the trunk, the team set about the difficult task of restoring the artifacts.

Experts say the items were ornaments used for the horses and carriage of the “boy pharaoh,” who was just 19 when he died in the year 1323 B.C. after a reign of nine years.

The Tutankhamun collection is to housed permanently at the Grand Egyptian Museum, scheduled to open next year.

The director of the Grand, Tarik Said Taufik, told EFE that the collection of gold objects held up pretty well in Carter’s wooden trunk because gold is one of the few elements that does not corrode.

What strikes a modern observer the most about the rediscovered pieces is the “high technology” that went into making them, the director of the German Archaeological Institute in Cairo, Stephan Seidlmayer, said at the opening of the exhibit.

The German Archaeological Institute was one of the organizations that oversaw the restoration of the artifacts.

 

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