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  HOME | Arts & Entertainment

Australia to Close Famed Uluru Monolith to Climbers from 2019

SYDNEY – Australia will ban climbing on the world-famous Uluru, earlier known as Ayers Rock, an aboriginal sacred monolith located in a remote desert location near Alice Springs in the Northern Territory, from 2019, according to local media reports on Wednesday.

The Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park board, comprising eight traditional owners and three representatives of the park management body, decided unanimously to close the rock to climbers, according to ABC news.

“The site has deep cultural significance and is not a theme park,” said chairman Sammy Wilson.

“The government needs to respect what we are saying about our culture in the same way it expects us to abide by its laws,” he added.

The ban will come into effect on Oct. 26, 2019 coinciding with the 34th anniversary of the handover of the Uluru – a 9-kilometer (5.5 miles) perimeter rock declared a World Heritage Site by the UNESCO – to its traditional owners, the Anangu community.

Since 1985, the Anangus, for whom the 600-million-year-old and 348 meters high rock has great spiritual, social and historical significance, have campaigned for the rock to be closed to climbing.

 

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