|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Sports (Click here for more)

Japanese Police Question Sumo Star over Alleged Beer Bottle Assault

TOKYO – Japanese police were interrogating Mongol sumo wrestler Harumafuji in Tokyo on Friday for allegedly assaulting a lower ranked wrestler with a beer bottle last month.

Harumafuji, considered one of the ancient Japanese sport’s best wrestlers, allegedly struck Takanoiwa, 27, with a beer bottle to the head on Oct. 25 at a restaurant in Tottori, in eastern Japan.

Takanoiwa reportedly suffered a concussion and a skull fracture, causing him to be hospitalized for several days. He also had to pull out of the Kyushu grand sumo tournament.

Harumafuji was cooperating with police after they called him in for questioning in response to a complaint by Takanoiwa, Kyodo news reports.

Harumafuji has denied the allegations, and fellow Mongol wrestler Hakuho, who was present during the brawl, said on Thursday that the accusation was not accurate.

The incident, which came to light earlier this week, has caused outrage in Japan, tarnishing the reputation of the sport which has already been marred by cases of corruption, violence and drugs.

On Friday, Japanese Sports Minister Yoshimasa Hayashi called the incident deplorable and urged the sumo association to clarify the incidents as soon as possible.

Sumo competition is interspersed with traditional Shinto rituals, in which the wrestlers are seen as guardians. They are required to maintain strict discipline and an exemplary code of conduct both inside and outside the “dohyo” (ring).

Harumafuji, 33, debuted in 2001 and has since won nine championships; in 2012, he was recognized as a “yokozuna,” making him the fifth foreign competitor to reach the highest rank in sumo wrestling.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved