|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Business & Economy (Click here for more)

Ghosn’s Lawyer Felt Betrayed over Client’s Departure from Japan

TOKYO – One of the Japanese lawyers representing former Nissan chief Carlos Ghosn said on Saturday he felt betrayed and angry over his client’s departure from Japan, but that he understood the decision and feared he would not have had a fair trial.

“My client Carlos Ghosn left Japan on December 29, 2019, ignoring bail conditions,” Takashi Takano said in a post on this personal blog.

Ghosn was awaiting trial in Japan over alleged financial irregularities.

Takano was one of his lawyers.

On New Year’s Eve, when Takano heard about Ghosn going to Lebanon, he said “a feeling of intense anger arose.”

“I was betrayed, but the one who betrayed me is not Carlos Ghosn,” Takano wrote.

He added that his anger turned in a different direction when he realized how Ghosn was treated by the Japanese judicial system.

In his blog, the lawyer mentioned Ghosn’s strict bail conditions and reproduced alleged conversations he had with the businessman in which he expressed concerns about not getting a fair trial in Japan.

Takano claimed that Ghosn told him alleged criminals in Japan could not get a fair trial and judges have no independent power.

Ghosn, 65, was born in Brazil to a family of Lebanese origin. He has French nationality as well.

He was last seen leaving his Tokyo home on a security camera which was installed at his residence under his bail conditions.

The camera captured footage 24 hours of the day, but the images were only presented to the judge on the 15th day of every month.

The former chief of the Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi alliance left Japan clandestinely and reached Beirut in a private jet with a stopover in Turkey earlier in the week.

He claimed to have left his country to escape “injustice and political persecution.”

According to Takano’s blog post, Ghosn had several times questioned whether he would get a free trial in the Japanese system since he was detained in late 2018.

The lawyer said Ghosn felt desperate and the frequency of his questions decreased as the process advanced.

Takano last saw the ex-Nissan boss on Christmas Eve during a video call – which was under strict vigilance and restriction by the judge – between Ghosn and his wife Carole.

Takano said that the majority of those accused cannot escape Japan like Ghosn did, but if they had his financial resources and connections they would try a similar thing.

“It is a lonely and disappointing conclusion. There should be a different conclusion,” said the lawyer.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2020 © All rights reserved