|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Business & Economy (Click here for more)

Jeepney Drivers in the Philippines Strike over Modernization Plans

MANILA – Thousands of jeepney drivers in the Philippines went on strike Monday in protest against plans to modernize the traditional mode of transport in order to make it better for the environment.

According to the Alliance of Concerned Transport Organizations (OTCA), some 70,000 jeepneys – each with space for 20 passengers – were brought to a halt due to the action.

The authorities laid on additional bus services for people who rely on the mode of transport to get to work.

Jeepneys are privately-owned vehicles that offer group transportation at affordable rates in the Asian nation’s congested cities, especially the capital Manila, where the public transport is insufficient.

But the decorative vehicles are also a symbol of national identity.

Jeepneys have been on the road since the end of World War II, when the Philippines adopted US military jeeps that were left at the end of the conflict.

Decades later, jeepneys are still made according to the same design, although they have been extended to accommodate more passengers and painted in bright colors.

For years, the authorities have been trying to renovate the beloved mode of transport, whose old second-hand engines are highly polluting.

In 2017, the government passed a plan that would remove jeepneys that by 2020 were older than 15 years old, and replace them with vehicles that run on ecological engines.

That plan affects some 300,000 jeepneys.

The Stop and Go coalition, which brings together the drivers affected, deemed the plan to be “anti-poor” as the new e-jeepney models cost about 2 million pesos ($38,500), a significant sum for workers who earn around 20,000 pesos per month.

The president of the Land Transportation Franchising and Regulatory Board, Martin Delgra, said on Monday that the governmental entity would assume 5 percent of the capital, 6 percent of the interest and offer the possibility of paying over their course of seven years to drivers who sign up to the plan.

Delgra said Congress has approved an 80,000-peso subsidy for each e-jeepney and some 5,642 drivers have already joined the plan.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2020 © All rights reserved