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  HOME | Business & Economy (Click here for more)

London Offers Advice for Businesses, Public in Case of No-Deal Brexit Outcome

LONDON – The United Kingdom government offered on Thursday its advice to businesses and the general public in the event that no deal is reached with the European Union on the country’s withdrawal from the bloc.

The Conservative government of Theresa May released 25 documents, dubbed “technical notes,” containing “practical” instructions for businesses and citizens covering topics including banking, medicine, nuclear research, labor rights and farming.

“They are designed to inform people and businesses in the UK about what they may need to do, if we don’t reach a deal with the EU,” said minister for exiting the EU, Dominic Raab. “They are part of a common sense approach to planning for a no deal Brexit.”

Raab said the government’s “top priority” was to reach a good deal with the EU during the ongoing negotiations but it was “ready to deliver Brexit for the British people if there is no deal.”

The minister said the goal would be to maintain a close trade relationship with the bloc, strengthen security cooperation and maintain initiatives such as student exchanges.

He said achieving a good deal was “the most likely outcome.”

London and Brussels were still in the negotiations phase, with key issues like the bilateral trade and the border between Ireland and Northern Ireland still to be agreed upon.

The UK is set to leave the EU in March 2018 after a referendum held in June 2016 saw the public narrowly voting in favor of such a move.

 

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