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  HOME | World (Click here for more)

Investigators Collect 150 Different DNA Profiles of Germanwings Crash Victims

PARIS – Investigators working on the wreckage from the Germanwings A320 that crashed on March 24 in the French Alps have identified 150 different genetic profiles; however, the samples collected at the site still need to be matched with DNA submitted by the families of those who died in the crash to verify their identities, a task that will begin early next week, Marseille prosecutor Brice Robin told reporters on Thursday.

Robin promised to notify each family immediately after the bodies of their relatives are identified, but stressed that the remains will not be delivered until the investigation committee meets to validate the results.

The second black box, which contains technical flight data records, was found earlier on Thursday by the French gendarmes, who have been working at the crash site for 10 days, which Robin said will be sent to Paris on Thursday to be analyzed.

The fateful flight suspected of being deliberately crashed by the co-pilot was en route from Barcelona, Spain, to Düsseldorf, Germany, and was operated by the Lufthansa low-budget subsidiary, Germanwings.

 

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