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  HOME | Latin America (Click here for more)

Most Countries in the Americas Reject Catalan Independence

BOGOTA – Most countries in the Americas rejected on Friday the unilateral declaration of independence by Catalonia and supported the unity of Spain, expressing concerns over the developments.

United States White House spokesperson Sarah Sanders said that the United States President Donald Trump supported a united Spain, answering media queries during her press brief.

“Catalonia is an integral part of Spain, and the US supports the Spanish government’s constitutional measures to keep Spain strong and united,” US Department of State spokesperson Heather Nauert said in a statement shared on Twitter.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said that Canada recognized a united Spain; while Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto refused to acknowledge the Catalan declaration of independence through a post on Twitter.

The government of Argentina urged the re-establishment of legality through constitutional measures guaranteeing the unity of Spain and rejected the declaration.

Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos, speaking at a press conference at government headquarters in Bogota, also expressed support for the territorial integrity of Spain and its government.

The government of Paraguay backed measures taken by the Spanish government in response to the Catalan declaration of independence, calling them the appropriate method to restore the rule of law.

The government of Ecuador expressed concerns over the situation in Catalonia – without making its political position clear – and urged dialogue to resolve the problem, although stressing that it had a policy of non-intervention in the internal affairs of other states.

The government of Peru backed Spain completely, calling the independence declaration an act against the Spanish constitution and laws.

Bolivia’s justice minister, Hector Arce, said that Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy was right in his actions in the light of the Spanish constitution.

The Central American countries of Panama, Costa Rica and Honduras also refused to recognize the declaration of independence and supported the unity of Spain.

On Friday, Rajoy dissolved the government and parliament of Catalonia and convened new elections for Dec. 21, as part of measures adopted to re-establish constitutional legality in the autonomous northeastern region.

An extraordinary meeting of the Spanish cabinet approved these measures – passed in the Spanish Senate with absolute majority – after the regional parliament of Catalonia had approved a unilateral declaration of independence.

 

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