|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Colombia (Click here for more)

Cars in Colombia, a Curious Epic Told in 127 Stories

BOGOTA – The curious history of the automobile in Colombia is now told in a book that includes unpublished photos of the first one to arrive in the country in 1899, which completes a quixotic project by Juan Guillermo Correa, a businessman who dedicated 22 years to research in order to speak of his country’s progress from a different angle.

Correa compiled, in 820 pages, 127 stories in which he meticulously lays out much of what Colombians experienced in adopting those “diabolical machines” that move themselves without being drawn by horses.

In the two-volume “Stories of the Automobile in Colombia,” this company manager relates that the first car to arrive in the country was bought in Paris by Carlos Coroliano Amador, an extravagant millionaire, owner of the biggest gold mines of the period, who brought it back to Medellin.

He found, however, that his new De Dion-Bouton was made for the smooth, asphalted streets of Paris, but its top speed was 25 mph (16 mph) and it lacked the power needed on Medellin’s rocky mountain roads.

The disappointing auto was soon buried on a hacienda and its French chauffeur sent back to Paris.

Correa also tells of two limousines owned midway through the last century by the president of Colombia, Gen. Gustavo Rojas Pinilla. Besides being armored, the windows were fixed so they could not be opened, and one of them was a gift from Argentine President Juan Domingo Peron.

“Dictators understand each other,” Correa says.

His research, which was aided by historian Gloria Angelica Morales, also indicates that the first car to reach Bogota was a Cadillac in 1903.

That “monster,” imported by the photographer Ernesto Duperly and his brother Oscar, terrified some of the locals in Bogota, others climbed trees to safety, and some knelt on the ground to pray.

The dismantled vehicle was sent by boat up the Magdalena River to the central Colombian city of Honda, and from there by muleback to Bogota, where it was assembled by a US engineer.

Correa also tells of Margarita Brigard de Umaña, the first woman in Colombia to have a driver’s license, issued on Dec. 22, 1919.

“Margarita was roundly criticized by society at a time when driving was considered an activity suitable for men only, and consequently, went against all the norms of feminine behavior,” Correa said.

This encyclopedia of the automobile also includes stories of famous vehicles, car racing, public transport, highway infrastructure, car dealers and advertising narrated by the author and by other auto experts.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2019 © All rights reserved