|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Colombia (Click here for more)

International Community Backs Colombia in Effort to Remove Landmines within 5 Years

NEW YORK – Countries all around the world, led by the United States and Norway, committed themselves on Sunday to supporting efforts to remove landmines in Colombia with an eye toward ridding that country of the weapons by 2021.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said at the start of a meeting on the issue held in a New York hotel that removing the landmines is an “essential” part of reconstruction after the achievement of a peace agreement between the Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, guerrillas.

The aim of the meeting is to garner additional support for the Global Demining Initiative for Colombia, launched this year by Washington and Oslo.

Kerry announced that the United States will contribution an additional $36 million to the effort, while his Norwegian counterpart, Borge Brende, said that his nation will contribute $22 million.

Also participating in the meeting is Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos, who said that the initiative “goes to the heart” and deals with “the most sensitive part” of what Colombia must do “to really have peace.”

Santos emphasized that, of all the atrocities and tragedies of the five-decade-long armed internal conflict, perhaps the issue of landmines is the “most horrible” and the one causing the “greatest suffering and impact.”

“It’s a challenge that, for me, is very important because it has torn me apart to see how disastrous the consequences of these mines are,” said the president.

Colombia is the world’s second-most-heavily-mined country, exceeded only by Afghanistan, and since 1990 more than 11,000 people have been killed or injured by these weapons.

The problem affects 700 of Colombia’s 1,100 municipalities and several dozen of them have begun the process of clearing the mines.

Last month, the Colombian government activated the world’s largest demining brigade, comprising some 2,500 members which will be expended next year to 10,000.

Joining the United States and Norway are about 20 other nations and entities such as the European Union, who will contribute financial and technical support for the demining effort.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved