|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Colombia (Click here for more)

Mining Company Reforests Vast Tract in Colombia

ALBANIA, Colombia – Coal miner Cerrejon has financed the reforestation of a large swath of land in northern Colombia that was left desolate by decades of mining activity.

Cerrejon, owned in equal parts by BHP Billiton plc, Anglo American plc, and Glencore plc, holds a 50-year concession to exploit La Mina, a spread of 69,000 hectares (170,370 acres) that is the world’s largest open pit coal mine.

Mining operations began in 1984 in the area known as Tajo Oeste, leaving behind a giant crater more than 100 meters (328 feet) deep.

The mining company filled the pit with uncontaminated soil, topped by a cap of vegetation to give life to a tropical forest.

“The issue of land rehabilitation is one of the elements where Cerrejon is a pioneer and something of an international leader,” company President Roberto Junguito Pombo told EFE.

So far, the reforested area comprises 3,552 hectares of native flora and fauna and attracts more than 6,000 tourists each year.

Iguanas, rabbits, birds, deer and “even two jaguars” have been spotted in the area, tour guide Joicy Romero said.

The company retains the topsoil from all areas where mining activity begins and has a group of environmental experts to do soil research and reforestation efforts.

Mining continues across roughly 6,000 hectares of La Mina, producing around 90,400 tons of coal per day for export to Europe, the U.S. and Asia.

Once the mining operations ends, Cerrejon plans to reforest the rest of the territory.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved