|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Colombia (Click here for more)

Low Turnout for Peace Rally in Colombia

BOGOTA – The Colombian left’s latest bid to organize a nationwide pro-peace rally went largely unheeded, in keeping with the population’s mostly lukewarm and passive response to the government’s efforts to end a decades-old conflict with the FARC guerrilla group.

Contrary to expectations, small crowds turned out for Friday’s march in Bogota, although young children, teenagers and adults took part in cultural activities at several “stations” set up at several points along the capital’s Carrera Septima thoroughfare.

President Juan Manuel Santos’ administration made no pronouncements about the planned rallies and did not actively participate in the day’s events.

Organizers were looking to promote support for a “yes” vote in an eventual referendum on a peace agreement with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, guerrilla organization, which has been holding talks with government representatives in Havana for more than three years.

Despite the optimism of organizers in the southwestern city of Cali, where representatives of different grassroots, indigenous, cultural, LGBT and conflict victims’ organizations had gathered, the turnout was far below expectations.

In the northwestern city of Medellin, Colombia’s second city, several hundred people marched through downtown holding flags of the Colombian Communist Youth and other left-wing political organizations.

Hundreds of people marched for peace in Popayan, capital of the southwestern province of Cauca, and other cities.

The Citizen Power movement issued the nationwide call to rally with the backing of several left-wing parties, mostly notably the Broad Front for Peace, whose spokeswoman, former Sen. Piedad Cordoba, urged Colombians to take to the streets.

Friday’s response was typical for the Andean nation, where scarcely any rallies were held after the government and the FARC signed a historic bilateral and definitive cease-fire agreement on June 23.

That deal requires the FARC rebels to lay down all of their weapons within 180 days of the conclusion of a final peace accord.

Prior to concluding the cease-fire, the government and the FARC reached agreements on land reform, political participation, drugs and drug crop, and redress for the victims of the strife.

The Colombian government maintains that the final peace accord should be put to a vote in a referendum.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved