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  HOME | Venezuela (Click here for more Venezuela news)

TalCual: Venezuela’s Opposition Should Adopt a Policy despite Negotiations with Government
This is no time for hesitation or personal interests. The crisis Venezuelans are going through is getting worse by the minute

By TalCual

On several occasions, members of the Democratic Unity Roundtable (MUD) opposition coalition have said they are willing to discuss and negotiate with the government of Nicolás Maduro a way out of the serious political crisis in the country. There have been two attempts without the expected results. Now the MUD is going for a third. Will it be the charm this time?

In spite of the statements of the MUD, there are stances adopted that seem not to be in accordance with the negotiations. Others have just said they know nothing different from what was explained in a statement released on what was covered in the Dominican Republic this month. This is in spite of being part of the so-called G9.

We believe that, in light of the difficult situation, political leaders must act with the utmost responsibility. The first thing we believe the MUD should do is start off an internal debate on each one of its political parties and, then, within the MUD as a whole on if it wants to negotiate or not. There should be no doubt on which path to choose.

We believe that the right path is negotiation, but some positions taken and statements by major opposition parties and leaders make us think that this path is not clear to all.

What we see today is that the opposition coalition has one less member with respect to the meetings that took place before the "election" of the illegal National Constituent Assembly (ANC). At that time, representatives of four opposition parties attended the meetings. Three of them did in the case of the Dominican Republic. The rest still insists that are not taken into account. This is not a good sign for a successful conclusion.

On the other hand, we see some leaders of the MUD speaking on the subject to the best of their knowledge. They are some kind of free electrons but with significant importance. We believe that the most convenient thing to do is to appoint a single authorized spokesperson to make suitable pronouncements on the subject.

We think that the most feasible option is to sit down and negotiate with the Government. In any case, what we are asking is that the MUD leaders discuss the issue and reach a conclusion that allows them to define a policy that we hope will be adopted by all its leadership. This is no time for hesitation or personal interests. The crisis Venezuelans are going through is getting worse by the minute.

 

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