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  HOME | Venezuela (Click here for more Venezuela news)

OAS Ends General Assembly without Resolution on Venezuelan Crisis
A group of countries led by Mexico attempted until the last minute to pass a resolution that included the petition to cancel the National Constituent Assembly of Venezuela, but failed to achieve three more votes to reach the 23 necessary

CANCUN, Mexico – The Organization of American States (OAS) closed on Wednesday its 47th General Assembly, held from Monday to Wednesday in Cancun, Mexico, without managing to adopt the final resolution on the Venezuelan crisis.

A group of countries led by Mexico attempted until the last minute to pass a resolution that included the petition to cancel the National Constituent Assembly of Venezuela, but failed to achieve three more votes to reach the 23 necessary at the meeting of the OAS foreign ministers on Monday.

These nations, including the region’s great powers such as the United States and Brazil, could not manage to include a reference to the Venezuelan crisis in the draft general resolution on human rights that was approved on Wednesday in the Assembly.

The group of 14 countries sought to include in that resolution a request for the government of Nicolas Maduro to reconsider the convening of the Constituent Assembly, among other demands.

To do this, they needed 18 votes, several sources from the OAS explained to EFE on Wednesday.

This was the plan they had designed in order that the Assembly in Mexico would not end without any agreement on the crisis in Venezuela, the key issue that would define the success or failure of the summit.

This strategy was easier to carry out than to submit a new draft resolution in the Assembly after the deadline, which would require 24 votes (two-thirds of the 35 member states), although after that only a simple majority of 18 is needed to be approved.

The government of Venezuela, which rejects any mediation from the OAS, has celebrated during these days a diplomatic “victory,” since no text on its crisis has been approved.

However, Venezuela invited on Wednesday Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, El Salvador, the Dominican Republic, Nicaragua and Uruguay to relaunch the dialogue with the opposition within the framework of the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC).

“Today we had a meeting (...) and they have been invited to relaunch the dialogue in Venezuela,” Venezuelan Foreign Minister, Delcy Rodriguez, announced at the OAS Assembly in Cancun.

In addition, Rodriguez is leaving office to present herself as candidate for her country’s National Constituent Assembly.

Rodriguez also said on Tuesday that the initiative that the US proposed to create a group of countries to accompany a new effort of dialogue in Venezuela was “useless and unnecessary” because this was an idea raised only within the framework of the OAS and included in the two proposals that were unsuccessful in the foreign ministers meeting.

Venezuela rejects any role of the OAS, an organization that it considers at the service of the US, and prefers other forums promoted by the late President Hugo Chavez, such as CELAC and UNASUR, in which neither the US nor Canada is a member country.

These two countries, along with Mexico and other major regional powers, have been the leaders of the OAS for months to demand that President Nicolas Maduro cancel the Constituent Assembly, release imprisoned politicians, and set election dates, among other demands.

 

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