|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Main headline

Over 100 Women Take Up Arms in Mexico to Defend Community
The women signed up over the past four days with the UPOEG, Xaltianguis community self-defense force commander Miguel Angel Jimenez said

MEXICO CITY – More than 100 women in the southern Mexican town of Xaltianguis have taken up arms to protect their community from organized crime groups, a local self-defense force official said Monday.

The women signed up over the past four days with the Union of Peoples and Organizations of Guerrero State, or UPOEG, Xaltianguis community self-defense force commander Miguel Angel Jimenez told reporters.

“We have an average of nine groups” of community police, with each one made up of 12 women who will work in the daytime in the neighborhoods of Xaltianguis, located about 50 kilometers (31 miles) from the resort city of Acapulco, Jimenez said.

The women will be trained in the use of firearms and carry the same weapons as men, Jimenez said.

The vigilante group has only about 80 firearms and the weapons are rotated among members, Jimenez said.

“I trust that the people, once they know that the women are participating,” will provide more weapons, Jimenez said.

Women were among the biggest supporters when the community self-defense forces were being formed, telling men that “either you join or I join,” Jimenez said.

“Women are brave and we are capable of defending our town,” said Silvia Hipolito, a mother of two who joined the self-defense group.

The women will learn how to use firearms and work schedules that allow them to continue taking care of their homes, Hipolito said.

UPOEG, whose members are armed and wear hoods, was created in January in Guerrero state’s Costa Chica region.

The self-defense group controls access to communities and polices them to fight crime blamed on drug traffickers and other organized crime groups.

Vigilante groups have appeared in recent months in several Mexican states, with the largest number being reported in Guerrero and the western state of Michoacan.


69-Year-Old Mexican Woman Chases, Runs Over Man Who Robbed Her Husband


Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:



 

 

Xbox Live Gratuit
Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2009 © All rights reserved