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  HOME | Arts & Entertainment

Robot Band Performs at Tokyo Club (VIDEO)

TOKYO – The musical group Z-Machines, made up of three Japanese robots, gave its first concert Monday at a popular club in downtown Tokyo to dozens of spectators and a large number of media outlets.

Behind this “music of the future” project, sponsored by a well-known liquor brand, is Yoichiro Kawaguchi, IT professor at the University of Tokyo, and designer Naofumi Yonetsuka, who specializes in mechanical creations.

The latter created the android guitarist and also the drummer, which with its six arms is capable of banging away on 22 different percussion points.

“What Ashura plays is the equivalent of four people playing drums,” Yonetsuka said during the concert at the Liquid Room.

Kawaguchi said he created the keyboard player Cosmo “in the shape of a super-evolved fish” to accompany the other two musicians in the project, conceived with the idea of offering the public “a concert of the future.”

In their debut in the Japanese capital, Mach on guitar, keyboard artist Cosmo and the drummer Ashura kicked off the show with a number called “Post People, Post Party,” conceived expressly for them by DJ Tasaka, a famous figure in Japanese electronic music.

Japan is known for having created other robotic artists, such as HRP-4C, a sophisticated machine resembling a Japanese woman, which has sung live several times since it was unveiled in 2009. EFE




 

 

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