|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Latin America (Click here for more)

IAPA President: Organized Crime, Authoritarianism Threaten Press in Latin America

By Anny Castro

TEGUCIGALPA – Inter American Press Association, or IAPA, president Jaime Mantilla said in an interview with Efe that organized crime, drug trafficking, authoritarian governments and impunity were the greatest threats to freedom of the press in Latin America.

“Now more than ever, drug trafficking and organized crime are attacking freedom of expression, murdering and threatening journalists,” Mantilla told Efe in Tegucigalpa.

The surge in violence in recent years in some Latin American countries due to the pressure of the drug cartels, according to the IAPA chief, has affected on a daily basis many journalists who work there.

Mantilla headed an IAPA mission that last Wednesday concluded a three-day visit to Honduras, where its members analyzed the situation of press freedom in the country, where President Porfirio Lobo in recent months has headed assorted confrontations with some local media outlets.

Lobo is even promoting a reform of the Telecommunications Law, rejected by media executives and journalists, who feel that the president is attacking press freedom.

At least 74 journalists were murdered in Latin America between 2010 and 2012, according to figures compiled by the International Freedom of Expression Exchange in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Just in Honduras, 21 journalists were murdered between 2010 and 2012, while local human rights defense organizations calculated that 35 people linked to the communications media were killed, Mantilla said. EFE


 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2019 © All rights reserved