|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Cuba

Cuban Dissident Faces Protests on First Day in Brazil

RIO DE JANEIRO – Cuban dissident Yoani Sanchez was received Monday with protests by a group of militant communists at the airport in the northeastern Brazilian city of Salvador.

A score of people waited for Sanchez at the Luis Eduardo Magalhaes airport with posters on which they had written “mercenary,” an epithet Cuba’s Communist government frequently hurls at dissidents.

A similar situation occurred earlier at the Recife airport, where Sanchez arrived on a flight from Panama and was welcomed by filmmaker Dado Galvao, her host in Brazil.

“According to Unicef, there are 140 million malnourished children in the world. None of them is Cuban,” said one of the signs carried by leftist militants in Recife, where a roughly equal number of people turned up to praise Sanchez’s “struggle for democracy” and demand “freedom for Cuba.”

When asked about these incidents, Sanchez told reporters that “that’s how democracy is and should be, the same democracy that we want for Cuba.”

“Regrettably, in Cuba thinking differently is punished and having an opinion against the government brings terrible consequences, arbitrary imprisonment and ongoing monitoring,” she said.

Sanchez said that while she was somewhat “concerned” about family members who remained behind in Havana, she was sure that she would not receive “bad news” during her 80-day trip through about 10 countries because “there have been some advances in terms of rights,” like the immigration reform that had allowed her to leave her country after she was denied an exit permit on 20 separate occasions.

She said, however, that “the dreamed-of reform, which is that of freedom of association and freedom of expression, apparently is not going to be achieved so soon.” EFE


 

 

Xbox Live Gratuit
Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2009 © All rights reserved