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  HOME | Cuba

Cuban Radio, TV Ban “Vulgar” Music

HAVANA – Broadcasting music with “vulgar, offensive” lyrics has become such a controversy in Cuba that it made its way into a parliamentary debate, during which the president of the state’s ICRT broadcasting monopoly announced that such content will be banned from the nation’s airwaves.

“On the national (radio and television) channels, it is decided once and for all: not one more number that is vulgar, not one more number that is banal, not a single number with offensive lyrics nor any videos that degrade women’s image,” Danilo Sirio Lopez told lawmakers.

“The challenge is to offer an audiovisual product that is better made and free from all vulgarity,” he said.

He also said that together with the Cuban Music Institute, the ICRT must promote the best of the national repertoire, while giving airtime to the talent to be found all around the country.

In recent times, culture officials and members of the island’s Writers and Artists Union have criticized the dissemination of “pseudo-artistic productions” and “vulgar, banal and mediocre expressions,” which are most “notorious” in the case of reggaeton music.

Indeed, Deputy Culture Minister Fernando Rojas said they have been working for months establishing legal regulations to preserve “the promotion of good taste.” EFE


 

 

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