|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Arts & Entertainment

Future of Spanish as International Language on the Line in U.S.

GUADALAJARA, Mexico – With more than 420 million people speaking it, the future of Spanish “as an international language” is on the line in the United States, the director of Spain’s Cervantes Institute told Efe on Friday.

“Large sectors of the United States perceive Spanish as a language of immigrants, not as a treasure. And that needs changing,” Victor Garcia de la Concha said.

On a visit to the Guadalajara International Book Fair, De la Concha said that Spain’s current economic crisis, which has entailed budget cuts for the Cervantes Institute, should not hold back the work of making Spanish a global language.

“It is now that Latin countries must unite even more to continue promoting Spanish the world over, above all in the United States,” De la Concha said.

The idea is to be well established in big American universities to make sure that future Spanish teachers are prepared to “do a good job of teaching the different varieties of Spanish” not only to neophytes in the language but also to second-generation Hispanics.

The aim of the Cervantes Institute, a public institution founded in 1991 to promote Spanish and the culture of Spanish-speaking countries, is to have a greater presence in American schools.

Garcia de la Concha said that an extensive project to internationalize Spanish cannot be done by “a Spanish Cervantes Institute alone,” but requires one that is “Ibero-American.”

The demand is growing: in Brazil, where the institute has eight offices, “20,000 teachers are needed,” while in “China, India, Korea and Singapore they’re asking us every day to set up Cervantes centers,” he said.

The institute is currently at work in 44 countries. EFE


 

 

Xbox Live Gratuit
Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2009 © All rights reserved