|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Arts & Entertainment

Mexican Artists Exhibit Works at New York’s Oldest Mansion

By Ruth E. Hernandez Beltran

NEW YORK – Prizewinning artists Andrea Arroyo and Felipe Galindo have “Mexicanized” the oldest mansion in New York with their exhibitions, in which she pays tribute to womankind and he with his drawings creates an imaginary visit by George Washington to Manhattan’s Washington Heights section, home to the largest Dominican community in the United States.

In the exhibition, which runs until Jan. 7 and which Arroyo has entitled “Women Unbound,” the artist does not forget her roots, paying tribute to her own country’s pre-Columbian goddesses and others from the mythologies of ancient Greece and India.

The artist told Efe she was inspired to create these works – in which she presents nude female figures on canvas and lace – by Eliza Jumel, the last owner of the Morris-Jumel Mansion, the oldest house in Manhattan, built in 1765 and which is today the Morris-Jumel Mansion Museum, where Arroyo is showing her work together with that of her husband, Felipe Galindo.

“It is a tribute to the historical and contemporary woman, because woman is life, creativity, strength. Womankind has always inspired my work,” the artist said.

The idea of staging an exhibit in this historic dwelling was to integrate her paintings into the different rooms “in such a way that they are seen as contemporary works of art, but also as a tribute to the Upper Manhattan area where they are being shown, and to the immigrants who come here with our own culture,” Arroyo said.

Notable among the works is one on lace that Arroyo painted with a figure inspired by Martha Washington at a time when her husband George Washington was fighting the American War of Independence against the English crown.

The painting on lace is displayed over the bed where Washington slept during the 30 days he stayed here, using the mansion as headquarters for his army during the 1776 Battle of Harlem Heights. EFE


 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved