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  HOME | Mexico

Mexico City Prosecutor Resigns After Failed Screening

MEXICO CITY – A prosecutor at the Mexico City District Attorney’s Office announced his resignation after word that he had failed a screening test eight months ago was leaked to the media.

All police and prosecutors in Mexico must pass tests to demonstrate their probity but Luis Genaro Vasquez – who had worked in the office of the assistant district attorney for prior investigations – failed his vetting process on May 4.

“I regret that legally confidential information was leaked eight months ago by sources within the Mexico City District Attorney’s Office,” Vazquez said in a letter Wednesday requesting his “immediate separation” from his post.

Vazquez, who had served as deputy prosecutor since July 2008, defended his track record while in office and asked Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to allow him another round of polygraph testing.

Judicial and law-enforcement officials in Mexico are closely screened amid an effort to tackle corruption and organized crime.

President Felipe Calderon has deployed tens of thousands of soldiers and Federal Police officers across the country to combat drug cartels and other criminal organizations.

The anti-drug operation, however, has failed to stamp out the violence due in part, according to experts, to the cartels’ ability to buy off the police and even high-ranking officials.

Turf war battles and shootouts between police and criminals have resulted in more than 50,000 deaths in Mexico over the past five years. EFE
 

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