|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Arts & Entertainment

Figures Found During Mural Restoration in Mexico

SAN CRISTOBAL DE LAS CASAS, Mexico – Mexican experts have discovered some small, previously hidden figures in a Mayan mural while carrying out restoration work on it, the National Anthropology and History Institute, or INAH, said.

Figures representing the heads of three men were found during the treatment being given to the Murals of Bonampak at the like-named archaeological site, located in the Lacandona jungle in the southern state of Chiapas, that dates back to the year 790 A.D.

Further information about the diminutive figures has not yet come to light, the INAH said.

At the same time, the iconography of two images painted on the upper part of the vault has been reinterpreted.

A preliminary study identifies them as personifications of a K’inich Ahau, or solar deity, and an as yet unidentified god.

The mural is considered a work “of the most advanced school of painting to exist in all Mesoamerica,” Constantino Armendariz, a member of the restoration team, said.

The mural showing a glorious moment in the reign of Chaan Muan II, when he vanquished and took prisoner enemies from the rival city of Sak’ Tz’i’, was painted on a surface of lime-sand, the INAH said.

The restoration treatment has done wonders for the paintings, allowing its scenes to be truly understood and revealing details previously hidden, with forms and backgrounds acquiring a new clarity and figures discovered that were never seen before, the institute said.

Restoration began in 2009 when ducts and cracks caused by earthquakes over the centuries were sealed.

Treating the murals that cover three-fourths of the archaeological site will take four to five years, but the first stage, the restoration of three walls, will be finished in November, Gilberto Buitrago, who is in charge of the team of six restorers, said. EFE
 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2019 © All rights reserved