|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Mexico

59 Escape from Mexican Border Prison

MEXICO CITY – Fifty-nine inmates escaped Friday from a prison in northern Mexico after a disturbance that left seven prisoners dead and at least five others injured, sources in the Tamaulipas state government told Efe.

The incident took place at the Cedes 2 penitentiary in Nuevo Laredo, just across the border from Laredo, Texas, the same institution from which 151 inmates fled last December.

Besides the 59 escapees, seven guards remain unaccounted for, the sources said.

Friday’s mass escape came less than two months after 17 inmates tunneled their way out of a prison in Reynosa, Tamaulipas, a city next door to McAllen, Texas.

In March, the person appointed to run Cedes 2 after the disappearance of the warden who presided over the December escape was stabbed to death by an inmate.

Forty-one guards were charged in connection with last year’s breakout from Cedes 2.

Mexico’s drug mobs sometimes engineer massive prison breaks in response to the killings and arrests of their gunmen.

Tamaulipas is one of the main battlegrounds in a turf war between the Gulf cartel and Los Zetas, a band of Mexican special forces deserters turned hired guns.

After several years as the armed wing of the Gulf cartel, Los Zetas went into the drug business on their own account and now control several lucrative territories.

More than 1,000 army troops have been deployed to Tamaulipas in recent weeks to support state and local law enforcement in their struggle with organized crime. EFE
 

 

Xbox Live Gratuit
Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2009 © All rights reserved