|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | World (Click here for more)

Press Freedom Watchdog Looks at Online Repressions

NEW YORK – Iran, Syria, Cuba, Russia and China are among the 10 worst repressors of the Internet, according to a report by the Committee to Protect Journalists published on Monday.

The CPJ also lists Belarus, Ethiopia and Myanmar as enemies of using the Internet to disseminate the news, as well as Tunisia and Egypt, where “the regimes have changed, but their successors have not categorically broken with past repressive practices.”

The report was presented to coincide with the celebration Tuesday of World Press Freedom Day.

The tactics that the CPJ reveals go from “the state-supported e-mail in China designed to take over journalists’ personal computers, to the carefully timed cyber-attacks on news Web sites in Belarus,” as well as Iran’s use of “sophisticated tools to destroy anti-censorship technology” and the Ethiopian government’s “monopolistic control over the Internet.”

The author of the report, Danny O’Brien, coordinator of the CPJ’s Internet campaigns, said in the text that the countries mentioned and “many other repressive regimes” also use more traditional techniques such as arbitrary arrest and violence against dissident bloggers.

The CPJ denounces such practices as denying the population access to the Web (Cuba), monopolizing the Internet (Ethiopia), attacking Web sites administered from exile (Myanmar), arresting bloggers (Syria), censoring e-mail and social networks (as during the protests in Tunisia) and interrupting the service (as in Egypt during its revolution). EFE
 

 

Xbox Live Gratuit
Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2009 © All rights reserved