|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Colombia (Click here for more)

Rains Leave 80 Dead in Colombia in 2011, Santos Says Worse Is Coming

BOGOTA – The heavy rains that lashed Colombia for more than a year have intensified in recent weeks, leaving 80 people dead and more than 66,000 affected to date in 2011 – but even so, President Juan Manuel Santos said Saturday that the worst is yet to come.

The latest balance given the press on Saturday by the Red Cross national disaster operations director, Cesar Urueña, says that in 2011 some 80 people have died and another 20 are missing because of the rains, floods and mudslides caused by the La Niña weather phenomenon.

There are also 40 people injured and more than 66,000 affected, according to statistics of the Red Cross, which calls for extreme care to be taken at this time in the provinces of Boyaca, Cundinamarca, Tolima and Huila in the central and southern parts of the country, because of the possible flooding of several rivers.

During this week alone, two serious accidents have occurred as a result of the heavy rains, with the tragic results of 30 victims, between dead and injured.

On Wednesday a bus was swept away by a mudslide and plunged down a ravine as it drove along a highway in the central-western province of Caldas. Of its 20 occupants, 17 died and 3 are still missing.

On Friday, seven people lost their lives and three others went missing in a mudslide that buried several homes in the northeastern province of Santander.

“What’s coming will be worse than anything we’ve seen,” President Santos warned Saturday during an event in the central municipality of Girardot.

The president forecast “incredible mudslides and floods such as we’ve never seen before” in this country, which almost all last year suffered the scourge of La Niña.

The downpours that hit Colombia in 2010, the worst in its history, left 310 fatalities, dozens of missing persons, hundreds of injured and 2.22 million affected, as well as homes, highways, bridges and thousands of hectares (acres) of crops destroyed.

The consequences of La Niña this year will continue to be “devastating,” Santos said, noting that the phenomenon will hit a Colombia “already very much weakened,” with rivers, reservoirs and canals still at “very high” levels from the rains of 2010.

He therefore asked citizens to act in a “responsible” way and follow orders for preventive evacuations, which up to now “have saved many lives.”
 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2019 © All rights reserved