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  HOME | Arts & Entertainment

Exhibit Honors Mexican Revolution’s Anonymous Heroes

MEXICO CITY – An exhibition of 120 photos taken by professional photographers during the 1910-1917 Mexican Revolution honors anonymous heroes of the armed conflict including women, children and youths who took part in the armed conflict.

The photography provides outstanding eyewitness documentation of the revolutionary process by presenting the “anonymous heroes” of the uprising at the beginning of the last century, exhibit curator Miguel Angel Berumen told Efe.

The exhibition “Mexico: Photograpy and Revolution,” which opened Monday at the Chapultepec Railings Open Gallery in Mexico City, brings together photos selected from 40 archives in Mexico, the United States and Europe, along with publications of the period that printed accounts of the those involved in the epic uprising and what they achieved.

The pictures are divided by subject matter including Warriors, Railroads, Devastations, Settings and Celebrations, and show such key participants as revolutionaries readying their weapons, Madero’s forces on the Rio Grande, a group of officers reviewing the troops, and the followers of Emiliano Zapata, leader of the Liberation Army of the South, sitting on a railroad.

The exhibition includes pictures by the Mexican photographers Manuel Ramos, Agustin Victor Casasola, Juan Ramirez Cachu and Antonio Ramirez Cacho, and by the Americans Homer Scott, Miller Cook and Walter Hadsell, who according to specialists were some of the close to 300 artists that witnessed and preserved the revolution for posterity.

These photographers considered the participation of women and children “indispensable” in obtaining pictures of the armed conflict, many of whom signed up voluntarily for training in photography.

The exhibit also includes images of historic figures like Pancho Villa on horseback, the soldier and politician Alvaro Obregon sitting with a group of Yaqui Indians, the revolutionary leader Francisco Madero commanding his army, and Emiliano Zapata with his secretary Efren Martinez.

Rounding out the exhibition is a series of pages from newspapers of the period such as France’s La Petite Illustration, Die Woche from Germany, The Sphere from England, and Spain’s Alrededor del Mundo, which portray Pancho Villa riding on horseback, crowds gathered in Mexico City’s Plaza del Zocalo, and pictures of fields strewn with bodies when the battles were over.

The exhibition is based on the publication “Mexico: Photography and Revolution,” which had the participation of the visual arts section of the Televisa Foundation, the National Arts and Culture Council (Conaculta) and the National Anthropology and History Institute (INAH). EFE
 

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