|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Bolivia

Three Brothers Lynched in Bolivia

LA PAZ – Three brothers were tortured and buried alive by peasants in the central Bolivian province of Cochabamba for allegedly killing an area resident, authorities said Wednesday.

Police told ATB television they recovered the bodies Tuesday after being alerted by the victims’ families about the lynching in Watallani, a village some 100 kilometers (60 miles) from Cochabamba city.

It took police nearly two hours to unearth the bodies from a ditch where they were found.

Basilio, Sabino and Bonifacio Espinoza were killed for allegedly murdering farmer Miguelino Delgado, but police say Delgado might have accidentally choked to death while drinking with the three brothers.

The Espinozas were seized Monday night by a mob of 60 people who pummeled them with stones, clubs and whips before burying them alive, according to press accounts.

Four police officers were tortured and killed in May by peasants in the western province of Potosi who accused the cops of crimes including murder.

Bolivian prosecutors have won convictions this year for the 2004 lynching of a mayor and for the vigilante killings of three policemen in 2008.

While the groups that carry out lynchings often claim to be administering “communitarian justice,” that argument is rejected by President Evo Morales – Bolivia’s first Indian president – and by indigenous organizations.

Morales signed into law in June a measure extending institutional recognition to “indigenous justice,” but authorities have yet to define the jurisdictional boundaries between the indigenous and Western systems of justice. EFE
 

 

Xbox Live Gratuit
Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2009 © All rights reserved