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  HOME | Arts & Entertainment

1,300-Year-Old Pots Found in Patio of Argentine House

BUENOS AIRES – A family found eight pots some 1,300 years old buried in the patio of their house in the northern Argentine town of Tilcara, the press said Tuesday.

The pots belonged to an indigenous people in the province of Jujuy near Bolivia, and were found by the brothers Franco and Gonzalo Carrazana as they were digging up their patio to start building an addition onto their home.

“The first piece appeared when we had dug some 40 centimeters (16 inches). Then another pot appeared that was next to a third,” Roberto Carrazana, the brothers’ uncle, told the daily Clarin.

“When we started to dig up the whole space, the fourth pot appeared. And as we went ahead slowly we realized that more began to appear, unbroken. That’s when we got in touch with the archaeologists,” he said.

Archaeologists at the Tilcara Interdisciplinary Institute will continue with the excavations to determine whether other valuable objects are to be found in the area where the Omaguaca Indians lived over a millennium ago.

The tubular pots, measuring 1.3 meters (4 1/4 feet) tall, date from around the year 700 and are thought to have been made before the construction of the Pucara, a pre-Columbian fortress on the Humahuaca Ravine, Humberto Mamani, who is directing the group of archaeologists, said.

Tilcara Mayor Felix Perez said that in the village there is a strip of land where “there is still a large quantity of archaeological traces” of the area’s ancient settlers. EFE
 

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