|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Colombia (Click here for more)

Peace Corps to Return to Colombia After 3 Decades

WASHINGTON – Colombia’s foreign minister on Tuesday signed an accord allowing the return of the Peace Corps to the Andean nation after an absence of almost three decades.

Jaime Bermudez signed the pact with the director of the Peace Corps, Aaron S. Williams, at a ceremony at the Colombian Embassy in Washington.

The accord establishes the return of the organization to Colombia starting in the second half of 2010 with an initial group of 20 volunteers.

Created by President John F. Kennedy almost half a century ago, the Peace Corps operated in Colombia from 1961 to 1981, sending a total of more than 4,600 volunteer workers in the areas of nutrition, health care, agriculture, education and small business activities.

“This Peace Corps program will encourage Americans and Colombians to work side by side on Colombia’s education initiatives, with a focus on youth development in local communities,” Williams said.

In 2009, at the invitation of the Colombian government, the Peace Corps made an evaluation of the possibilities for resuming the program, taking into account the country’s social needs and the security conditions within its territory.

The U.S. ambassador to Bogota, William Brownfield, expressed in the communique that the return of the Peace Corps to Colombia “marks a sign of our deep, long-standing bonds and Colombia’s continued progress in delivering security to its people.”

“(T)he presence of Americans teaching English to Colombians promotes a better understanding of each other’s cultures and the democratic values we share. Improved English skills will, in turn, better Colombians’ economic and educational opportunities allowing them to compete in a globalized world,” the U.S. envoy said.

The first group of about 20 volunteers will arrive in Colombia in the fall or in the last quarter of this year, and they will work as English teachers in primary and secondary schools and at institutions for teacher training.

They will also work on community development initiatives all along Colombia’s northern coast.

Bermudez signed the accord within the framework of his official tour of the U.S. capital to participate in the 40th Washington Conference on the Americas.

The minister also will meet with the White House national security adviser, Gen. James Jones; Rep. Howard Berman (D-Calif.), who chairs the Foreign Relations Committee in the House of Representatives; and Dan Restrepo, an adviser to President Barack Obama on Latin American affairs. EFE
 

 

Xbox Live Gratuit
Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2009 © All rights reserved