|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Venezuela (Click here for more Venezuela news)

Venezuelan Government to Cut Electricity to 96 Big Users

CARACAS – The government plans to cut service to 96 big electricity users in Caracas on Monday for not having been able to reduce their consumption by at least 20 percent as officials requested, Venezuelan Vice President Elias Jaua said.

Everyone, especially those who are heavy consumers of electricity, must work to alleviate the power shortage problem caused by the worst drought registered in the country since 1947, Jaua said.

The majority of the industries and businesses have reduced their consumption, although not by the necessary percentage, Jaua said, adding that the government is studying the idea of “giving credits” to those sectors to allow them to buy their own electricity generating plants.

Despite the seriousness of the situation, the country will not collapse as a result of shortage of electricity although if it does not rain the power blackouts may be intensified, Jaua said.

Jaua discussed the matter during a ceremony Saturday in Caracas to acknowledge small industries and business who managed to reduce their electricity consumption by at least 20 percent.

The drought has caused the water level at the Guri Dam, which supplies more than 70 percent of Venezuela’s electricity, to fall drastically.

The ideal solution would be for the rains to begin in May, as historically has been the case, so that the rate of fall of some 14 centimeters per day in the water level at the Guri dam can be halted, officials said.

The rainy season in Venezuela should begin in May, unless the effects of the “El Niño” weather phenomenon persist, whereby the drought would be prolonged.
 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2020 © All rights reserved