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  HOME | Brazil (Click here for more)

Child Prostitution Rampant at Brazil Truck Stops

RIO DE JANEIRO – A study by Brazil’s highway police identified at least 1,819 places where little girls and teens offer sexual services to truck drivers, O Estado de Sao Paulo newspaper reported on Tuesday.

On average, truckers and other drivers can find a spot with underage prostitutes every 26.7 kilometers (166 miles) along the Brazilian highways, according to the police report.

The study found that in some places minors were offering sex for as little as 2 reais ($1.10) to be able to buy crack.

The police considered as likely places for child prostitution all the gas stations, bars, restaurants and night spots along the highways, the kind establishments where minors have already been caught offering sexual services.

The map of likely places was prepared in association with the International Labor Organization.

Police now propose to use the study to define the most likely spots and increase oversight, but the results will not be made public.

“We believed that identifying the spots would stop crimes from being committed, but we found that it only causes a migration to other places,” the president of the Human Rights Commission of the Federal Highway Police in Sao Paolo, Waldiwilson dos Santos, said.

“Now we’re going to maintain secrecy so as not to undermine our operations,” he said. EFE
 

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